Citrus Combined-Cycle Natural Gas Plant Project

Duke Energy's new 1,640-megawatt combined-cycle natural gas plant in Citrus County, Fla., is on track to deliver cleaner, more efficient energy for Floridians. The new plant is expected to start serving Duke Energy's 1.8 million Florida customers by the end of the year. 

Once the new plant is in service, the company will retire Crystal River coal-fired units 1 and 2, which were built in 1966 and 1969, respectively. Those units represent half of the company's coal-fired fleet in Florida. 
 
The Citrus project is Duke Energy's largest combined-cycle natural gas plant project under construction. The project is also one of the largest in the industry. 
 
Construction and related activities are expected to have an area economic benefit of more than $600 million during construction and $13 million annually when operating. During the height of construction, the project created more than 2,800 temporary construction jobs and benefited more than 100 companies locally, in Florida, across the U.S. and around the world. 
 
Once construction is complete, 50 to 75 workers will be needed to operate and maintain the plant.
 
Building highly efficient natural gas plants is part of Duke Energy's balanced approach to meeting future demand for reliable and increasingly clean energy.
 
Combined-cycle natural gas plants also generate energy more efficiently and release significantly lower emissions than coal-fired units. For example, by investing in the Citrus combined-cycle natural gas plant, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and other emissions are expected to drop by 90 percent, compared to the operation at Crystal River coal-fired units 1 and 2. 
 
The new Citrus plant will receive natural gas through the recently constructed 515-mile Sabal Trail pipeline. The $3.2 billion pipeline starts in Alabama, extends through Georgia and ends in central Florida. Construction of the Sabal Trail pipeline, including the lateral that will feed the Citrus plant, is completed. Sabal Trail's metering and regulating station, located at the Citrus project site, is also completed. 


Citrus Combined-Cycle Natural Gas Plant

Combined-cycle Natural Gas Plant in Citrus County, Fla.
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Frequently Asked Questions

  • As identified in Duke Energy’s 10-year site plan, the company needs approximately 2,200 megawatts of generation as a result of retiring the Crystal River Nuclear Plant and Crystal River coal-fired units 1 and 2. Building highly efficient natural gas plants is part of Duke Energy's balanced approach to meeting future demand for reliable and increasingly clean energy.
  • Duke Energy broke ground on the new 1,640 megawatt combined-cycle plant on March 2, 2016. The two-unit plant is on track to deliver cleaner, more efficient energy for Floridians. The new plant is expected to start serving Duke Energy's 1.8 million Florida customers by the end of the year.
  • Duke Energy is committed to the highest levels of performance in environmental compliance, practices and stewardship. Combined-cycle natural gas units generate energy more efficiently and release significantly lower emissions than coal-fired units. By investing in the Citrus combined-cycle natural gas plant, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and other emissions are expected to drop by 90 percent, compared to the operation at Crystal River coal-fired units 1 and 2.

    Duke Energy will retire these 1960s-era coal-fired units, representing half of our coal-fired fleet in Florida, when the new natural gas plant starts serving customers.

  • Construction and related activities are expected to have an area economic benefit of more than $600 million during construction and $13 million annually when operating. During the height of construction, the project created more than 2,800 temporary construction jobs and benefitted more than 100 companies locally, in Florida, across the U.S. and around the world.
  • The new Citrus plant will receive natural gas through the recently constructed 515-mile Sabal Trail pipeline. The $3.2 billion pipeline starts in Alabama, extends through Georgia and ends in Central Florida. Construction of the Sabal Trail pipeline, including the lateral that will feed the Citrus plant, is completed. Sabal Trail's metering and regulating station, located at the Citrus project site, is also completed.