EV Initiatives

What We're Doing

Duke Energy is doing a lot with industry-leading automotive manufacturers, charging system providers, government organizations and other stakeholders to promote electric vehicles (EVs). We are also conducting research to better understand how EV charging may impact the grid.

We're also promoting EVs within our fleet. Currently we have more than 250 EVs including passenger, light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles and recently made an order for an additional 500 electric pickup trucks.

Our Current Programs 

We are working with various organizations to promote clean transportation and find ways to encourage EV adoption. Initiatives include increasing access to EV charging, researching how residential EV charging affects the grid and helping companies make the switch from fuel-powered equipment to electric.

Charge Florida

In Florida, Duke Energy launched an electric vehicle (EV) study with FleetCarma called Charge Florida. The three-year study will provide insight into what impact residential EV charging has on the grid. It will monitor when people charge, how much energy they use and overall charging behaviors to gain valuable perspective. 

Park & Plug 

In 2018, Duke Energy launched this pilot program to expand access to EV charging stations in Florida. More than 530 EV chargers (Level 2 and Fast Chargers) are being added in public spaces and thoroughfares in Florida. Duke Energy will provide the equipment, installation, warranty and network connection services free of charge through 2022 of the pilot program.

 
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Industry Initiatives

To advance the use of electric vehicles (EVs) and better understand their impacts on our grid, we are working with leading companies in the industry as well as local organizations. These joint efforts include community education, research to better understand EV technologies, and testing and deployment of charging stations.

  • As part of our commitment to build a cleaner and smarter North Carolina, in March 2019 Duke Energy proposed a $76 million initiative to spur electric vehicle (EV) adoption across the state. This is one of the largest proposed investments in public and private EV infrastructure in the nation. The initiative will help fund the adoption of electric school buses and electric public transportation and lead to more than 2,500 new charging stations in the state. 

    North Carolina currently has more than 600 public charging stations. Nationwide, there are more than 1 million EVs on the road. The three-year program requires North Carolina Utilities Commission (NCUC) approval.

    The proposed initiative before the NCUC has several components:
    • Residential EV Charging: This program would provide a $1,000 rebate for qualifying Level II charging stations for up to 800 residential customers. Level II charging allows customers to charge their EVs up to six times faster than at a standard wall outlet.
    • Public Charging: Duke Energy would install and operate more than 800 public charging stations across North Carolina, including DC Fast Charging, Public Level II and multifamily locations, which will approximately double the state's network of EV charging stations. 
      • DC Fast Charging stations would be installed in 120 locations, which would help make quick charging during long trips more practical throughout the state. 
    • Fleet EV Charging: The program would provide a $2,500 rebate for 900 qualifying charging stations for commercial and industrial customers who operate fleets that are transitioning to electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. Municipalities and universities also qualify for these rebates.
    • EV School Bus Charging Station: Duke Energy would provide financial support to eligible customers to procure up to 85 electric school buses. Duke Energy will install the associated charging infrastructure.
    • EV Transit Bus Charging Station: Duke Energy would install and operate more than 100 electric transit bus charging stations for eligible transit agencies electing to procure electric buses. Electric transit buses eliminate diesel emissions and reduce fuel and maintenance costs for transit agencies.
    Gov. Roy Cooper signed an executive order to have 80,000 EVs on the road in North Carolina by 2025. Currently there are around 14,000 EVs in North Carolina. To fulfill this order, the state needs increased EV infrastructure and education, which our programs will help bring

  • In October 2018, Duke Energy proposed the South Carolina Electric Transportation Pilot to the Public Service Commission of South Carolina (PSCSC). The proposed $14.5 million pilot consists of four programs designed to support the higher adoption of electric vehicles (EVs) and to better understand the effects of electric transportation on Duke Energy’s energy systems. The three-year pilot will also study the charging behavior of customers and the potential financial and environmental benefits to the state of South Carolina. 

    The four programs include:
    1. Residential EV Charging: Rebates to support deployment of up to 400 smart, networked residential chargers
    2. EV School Bus: Rebates to support deployment of up to 15 electric school buses
    3. EV Transit Bus: Rebates to support the infrastructure of up to 30 electric transit buses
    4. DC Fast Charging Station: Deployment of up to 60 DC Fast Charging (DCFC) installations across the South Carolina territory to provide a foundational level of infrastructure
    The proposed pilot must be approved by the PSCSC before it can be offered to customers.
  • Charge Florida
    In Florida, Duke Energy launched an electric vehicle (EV) study with FleetCarma called Charge Florida. The three-year study will provide insight into what impact residential EV charging has on the grid. It will monitor when people charge, how much energy they use and overall charging behaviors to gain valuable perspective. 

    Park & Plug 
    In 2018, Duke Energy launched this pilot program to expand access to EV charging stations in Florida. More than 530 EV chargers (Level 2 and Fast Chargers) are being added in public spaces and thoroughfares in Florida. Duke Energy will provide the equipment, installation, warranty and network connection services free of charge through 2022 of the pilot program.

  • The Clean Fuels Ohio organization received a $500,000 grant from the Department of Energy to create an EV readiness plan for Ohio. The objectives of the project are to develop local, regional and statewide plans and implement policies that support the deployment of EV charging infrastructure in Ohio. We will participate as a key stakeholder to share what we have learned from other states. Visit Clean Fuels Ohio.
  • We tested EV charging stations and EVs at our Envision Center in Erlanger, Ky.

News and Press Releases

Driving or considering an EV?

We want to hear from you! Take this quick survey to let us know your thoughts on electric vehicles, and we’ll keep you posted on our future EV programs.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Although we don't currently offer charging station services, we are happy to provide you with resources and information to help you with your decision. Email us at DriveElectric@duke-energy.com for more information. If you're a commercial customer, you may also wish to contact your account manager with specific questions about potential impacts to your bill or new service requests.
  • We don't currently offer an EV specific electric rate. However, depending on which state you live in, we do offer a "whole house" time-of-use rate, which can help lower your electric bill. Please contact Customer Service to learn more.
  • Email us your information and we will let you know as we develop programs for our business customers. If you have other questions, email us at DriveElectric@duke-energy.com or call 800.979.9145. We will work to answer your questions promptly.

Contact Us

Have questions about Duke Energy’s work with electric vehicles or what is happening in your area? Please contact us.

Duke Energy is not affiliated with the manufacturers or vendors, does not expressly or implicitly warrant the performance of the products and is not liable for any damage caused by these products or for any damage caused by the malfunction of these products. Any non-Duke Energy logo or trademark is owned by its respective manufacturer or its assignee. Duke Energy, 400 South Tryon Street, Charlotte, NC 28202.


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