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Duke Energy's GoGreen Power Make a Contribution to the Solution.

Sign Up Today!

You can sign up online or by calling 800-423-5401.

Green power is electricity produced from resources – like the sun, wind, water and more – that do not pollute our environment. This type of energy is harnessed all over the world and is key to our country’s efforts to reduce its carbon footprint. But green power projects are more expensive than standard power generation, so we’re helping the development by asking our communities for support.

Duke Energy’s GoGreen Power program gives you the ability to support the development of green power sources throughout the state and the region. Here’s how it works:

  • Sign up for GoGreen Ohio either online or by calling 800-423-5401.
  • Purchase a minimum of two 100-kilowatt-hour (kWh) blocks of green power for just $2 a month. Your 200-kWh commitment equates to about 20 percent of an average residential customer’s electricity use and helps to avoid 4,800 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions each year.
  • Once you sign up, the equivalent amount of certified, green power is delivered to the electric grid. These new renewable projects would not have happened without the support of your contributions. Your monthly commitment also supports renewable energy education in our state.

As more Duke Energy customers commit to GoGreen Power, our collective positive impact on the environment grows. You can sign up for two or more 100 kWh blocks through the online form or by calling 800-423-5401.

Monies paid to participate in the program go directly toward the purchase of renewable energy certificates and program administration.

We want to know what you think about green power. Tell us here.

Wind Farm

Did you know...

Since the GoGreen Ohio program launched in the beginning of 2011, participants have supported over 17 million kWh of Green-e certified wind power. Contributions currently support the Benton County wind farm in Indiana, pictured at right.

—as of June 30, 2014