Advancing the “fifth fuel” — U.S. EPA case study

From left: John Boone, Tom Fenimore and Ken Kernodle

As Sam Pagán of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) notes on a previous page, when the agency needed an energy management and monitoring system for its massive complex of labs, offices and computing facilities in Research Triangle Park in North Carolina, Duke Energy delivered. Three teams from Duke Energy — account management, business development and custom delivery — collaborated with the EPA’s energy management team to get the job done.

The first idea was to measure the allocation of electric power and its costs building by building. But it soon became apparent that to achieve the EPA’s objective — to view total energy use in real time and analyze that data — a more comprehensive solution would be needed.

The teams worked together to replace ineffective measurement and metering systems with a new energy monitoring and reporting system. The new system tracks the use of city water, natural gas, fuel oil, chilled and heated water, and electricity for the whole complex. It collects the data on a secure Web site and makes it available to campus energy management systems. Controllers working from a central office, or from anywhere on campus with a wireless laptop computer, can monitor and project the energy needs for individual buildings or for the entire complex.

The Duke Energy team also earned the right to install and maintain the system, which may serve as a model for other EPA facilities. As part of the company’s renewed focus on energy efficiency, Duke Energy consults with its other large business customers on the benefits of total energy measurement systems.

 

(FROM LEFT) JOHN BOONE, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER, TOM FENIMORE, MANAGER OF ENERGY MANAGEMENT SERVICES, AND KEN KERNODLE, CUSTOMER RELATIONS MANAGER, WORKED ON THE DUKE ENERGY TEAMS THAT DESIGNED, DEVELOPED AND DELIVERED AN ENERGY MANAGEMENT SOLUTION FOR THE EPA.